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Aryanism and Indology

Students will gain a historical overview of German Indology from its origins to the present. They will read basic source texts for German attitudes towards ancient and modern India, especially the Vedic period, Brahmanism, and Hinduism. They will learn how German nationalism, theories of racial supremacy, the quest for Aryan identity, and Protestantism and Lutheran anti-Semitism shaped the discipline of Indology. German Indology’s role in fostering National Socialism and the treatment of Jewish Indologists will also be discussed. Students will also be expected to read and analyze excerpts from Rammohan Roy, Dayanand Saraswati, Tilak, and Ambedkar in light of their knowledge of Indology.

Areas of Study: History and Methods

Required/ Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study/ Must have completed Orientation to Hindu Studies or Concurrently enrolled in OTHS

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee

Start Date: TBD

End Date: TBD

Day: TBD

Time: TBD

Quarter: TBD

Program Description:

The Certificate program in Hindu Studies (C.P.H.S) prepares Students to engage with the world as a Hindu with confidence and clarity. Along the way, it also aims to develop in the student a lifelong love for service and contribution. At the end of the program, students will be informed, empowered, and inspired by the possibilities of living a deeply fulfilled life as a Hindu, and making a real difference in the world. As Students discover the range and depth of Hindu thought, its uniquely awesome cosmology, and clear up some of the misconceptions and erroneous narratives that they have inherited, they will find themselves being profoundly transformed, naturally creating new realms of self-expression, and new possibilities for who they can now be in the world. 

Program Learning Outcomes: 

At the end of this Certificate Program, Students will: 

  1. Clarify the Hindu Paradigm, having acquired an overview of Hindu principles, practices, values, history, philosophy, society, culture, traditions, and civilization. 
  2. Articulate the contemporary relevance of Hindu thought and contribute its value to the Hindu community as well as to humanity in general. 
  3. Apply their learning to think from a Hindu context and develop strategies for the preservation and transmission of Hindu thought across the generations. 
  4. Create new pathways for service, leadership, and global engagement from a Hindu context, and new realms of self-expression for themselves. 
  5. Contribute with confidence and clarity, in unique and innovative ways towards fostering the culture and traditions of Hindu Dharma. 

Program Context

Being successful in our professional lives, as a Doctor, Engineer, Business person, Entrepreneur, or a Lawyer and so on, equips us with a basic ability to compete effectively in the contemporary economy, to survive and succeed in the world. But it does not necessarily address a deeper dimension of human possibility i.e., the spiritual or the Adhyatmika realm. In each of us lies dormant a need and a desire for deeper engagement with the world, to contribute, to make a difference and be of service in a profound and meaningful way. In each of us lies as yet unfulfilled the potential for leadership and global impact, sometimes even as yet unimagined. In every one of us without exception there lies the possibility of going within, exploring the realms of deeper levels of consciousness, and transforming our connection and relationship with the cosmos itself, manifesting the perfection and possibilities that already lie within us. These are the realms of Dharma and Moksha, the unique dimensions of Hindu thought. 

What is the purpose of our human existence? Does it have one? What does it mean to live a successful life? What is the source of deep fulfillment and contentment in our lives? What is Dharma? What is our Svadharma? How do we ensure that we fulfill the unique purpose and opportunity of our lives? How do we even discover it? Have we exhausted the possibilities of being alive already? How has Hindu Dharma addressed these questions? 

In the Certificate Program in Hindu Studies, Students will engage with these questions in a deep and authentic way, as they prepare themselves for service, leadership, and contribution, and for making a deep and lasting impact in the communities in which they live, as well as the world in general. Whether you are interested in writing, speaking, and teaching, in counseling and healing, in social work, media or the performing arts, in education and curriculum development, in providing leadership in your communities, working with youth or in inter-faith domains, or simply engaging with schools and colleges, and the institutions of our contemporary world, or being of service in some other vital way, the Certificate Program in Hindu Studies, will empower and enable you in your life’s journey. 

This program will take work, commitment, and the ability to sustain your interest through several quarters. But what you will accomplish at the end, who you will become in the process, and all the new aspirations and possibilities that you will create for yourself, that you didn’t even know that you had, will transform you in an amazing and inspiring way. You will go beyond your real or perceived limitations, capacity and capabilities, and may even sustain and nurture the continued relevance of Sanatana Dharma for posterity as its ambassador. 

Structure of the Program:

The certificate program consists of a total of 24 credit hours of coursework. It can be completed at the earliest in 8 quarters, if the students can take 3 Credit hours per quarter, or more slowly over time, in any case, under five years. Students must take at least 15 Credit hours from the Core Courses in the Certificate program. They may complete the remaining 9 credit hours by taking any set of elective courses from the community education program. 

Pre-requisites:

The students must have completed the Orientation to Hindu Studies course minimally and must demonstrate a deep interest in service, contribution and making an impact from within a Hindu context, in order to be admitted into the Certificate Program in Hindu Studies. Students who have not taken the Orientation to Hindu Studies course, may enroll into the Certificate Program in Hindu Studies, with the understanding that they will register into the course immediately.

Who will benefit?

This program can benefit everyone who is interested in living a life of service and contribution, who wishes to engage with the communities in their lives in a meaningful way, in a Hindu context. It applies to all those who wish to reconnect deeply with their own Hindu cultural roots, develop a deeper understanding of their own unique place in the world. For Non-Hindus who have developed some level of curiosity and interest in the Hindu world, this program will deepen their engagement with that world, and open up entirely new possibilities for contribution and service. 

List of courses

The list of Courses available for Students as part of the Certificate Program in Hindu Studies is listed below. Each course is designated as a Core course or an Elective course. These courses may be taken in any sequence, as long as the student first completes the Orientation to Hindu Studies course, at the very beginning of the program.

Giving

Introduction to the Vedic Ritual

HSF1401 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) Ritual is the laboratory where the mind is purified, settled, and prepared for higher ... Read More
An Immersive exploration of the iconic "Autobiography of  a Yogi"

An Immersive exploration of the iconic “Autobiography of a Yogi”

YOG2100 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) Of all the books that spread Hindu dharma beyond India, none has had as ... Read More
Establishing the Importance of Hindu Studies in an Academic Setting

Upanishadic Dialogues – I: The Chandogya Upanishad

HSF3001 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This course will explore the metaphysics of Hindu Philosophy through a detailed analysis of ... Read More
Living our Svadharma in a contemporary world

Living our Svadharma in a contemporary world

HSF1101 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) A practical guide to - living our svadharma. Living in the contemporary world is ... Read More
Introduction to Hindu Philosophy: ‘Shad Darshanas’

Introduction to Hindu Philosophy: ‘Shad Darshanas’

HSF2001 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This course will introduce the student to the six traditional perspectives of Hindu Philosophy, ... Read More
The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma  In the Light of Sri Aurobindo - Part 1

The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma  In the Light of Sri Aurobindo – Part 1

HSF3101 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) More than any one single figure, Sri Aurobindo prophesied that the renaissance of Sanatana Dharma ... Read More
Sankhya Darshana through the Sankhya Karika – Part I

Sankhya Darshana through the Sankhya Karika – Part I

HSF3201 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This Course is the first of a two-part course series presenting an in-depth exploration ... Read More
Ramayana for Excellence in Management and Leadership

Ramayana for Excellence in Management and Leadership

HSF3301 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This course aims to introduce Srimad Ramayana as an important literature in teaching and ... Read More
Hindu Contributions to the world in the realm of matter

Hindu Contributions to the world in the realm of matter

HSF1202 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This course explores the contributions of the Hindus to the world in the realm ... Read More
grammar

Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner -Gnana

HSF1302 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner - Gnana is the second part of a three-part sequence ... Read More
The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma In the Light of Sri Aurobindo - Part 2

The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma In the Light of Sri Aurobindo – Part 2

HSF3102 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) More than any one single figure, Sri Aurobindo prophesied that the renaissance of Sanatana ... Read More
Sankhya Darshana through the Sankhya Karika – Part 2

Sankhya Darshana through the Sankhya Karika – Part 2

HSF3202 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This Course is the Second of a two-part course series presenting an in-depth exploration ... Read More
The Three Vedantic Perspectives on the Bhagavad Gita

The Three Vedantic Perspectives on the Bhagavad Gita

TAT4002 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) Hindu Thought provides for the simultaneous co-existence of varied perspectives on the nature of ... Read More
Certificate Program in Hindu Studies

Certificate Program in Hindu Studies

The Certificate program in Hindu Studies (C.P.H.S) prepares Students to engage with the world as a Hindu with confidence and ... Read More
Sri Ramcharitmanas: Continuity in Change

Sri Ramcharitmanas: Continuity in Change

TAT1201 - This course explores the Ramcharitmanas, an epic poem composed in the sixteenth century in Ayodhya, North India, some ... Read More
Dhyaanam – Meditation and the Meditator

Dhyaanam – Meditation and the Meditator

HSF2101 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) Living in the contemporary world includes navigating conflicts at the level of family, work, ... Read More
Bhagavad-Gita for the beginner - YOGA

Bhagavad-Gita for the beginner – YOGA

HSF1303 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) “Bhagavad-Gita for the beginner - YOGA” is the last part of a three-part sequence of ... Read More
The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma In the Light of Sri Aurobindo - Part 3

The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma In the Light of Sri Aurobindo – Part 3

HSF3103 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) More than any one single figure, Sri Aurobindo prophesied that the renaissance of Sanatana ... Read More
Dakṣiṇāmūrtistōtram by Ādi Śaṅkara

Dakṣiṇāmūrtistōtram by Ādi Śaṅkara

TAT3001 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course will unfold the Dakṣiṇāmūrtistōtram systematically verse by verse, drawing upon where necessary ... Read More
Sustainability is Sanatana Dharma

Sustainability is Sanatana Dharma

CPS2003 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course explores how the modern quest for sustainability relates to the eternal search ... Read More
Exploring Hinduism -Geography and History

Exploring Hinduism -Geography and History

HSF1001 - (C.P.H.S – Core Course) “Exploring Hinduism – Geography and History”, is the first course in the series titled "Exploring ... Read More
Vishnu Sahasranama Stotram

Vishnu Sahasranama Stotram

TAT1301 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course on Vishnu Sahasranama stotra, will prepare students to chant the slokas with ... Read More
Understanding Hinduphobia

Understanding Hinduphobia

HSF2201 - (C.P.H.S – Core Course) This course serves as a starting point for those who are interested in learning ... Read More
Story Writing Intensive

Story Writing Intensive

HSF1501 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course is about writing to enjoy, writing to entertain, and writing with an ... Read More
The Yoga of Global Transformation

The Yoga of Global Transformation

This course explores how humanity can meet the ever-pressing challenge of global sustainability, that we all confront collectively. It explores ... Read More
Antaranga Yoga

Antaranga Yoga

YOG3100 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) Antaranga yoga course is designed to use the itihasa-purana Mahabharata as a mirror to ... Read More
Exploring Hinduism for Teens and Parents

Exploring Hinduism for Teens and Parents

HSF1001 - (C.P.H.S – Core Course) “Exploring Hinduism – The Overview”, is the first course in the series titled "Exploring Hinduism" ... Read More
Indian and Western Music Traditions – A Comparative Study

Indian and Western Music Traditions – A Comparative Study

TAT3103 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course is the first of a three-part course sequence in the Hindu Musical Traditions ... Read More
Hindu Musical Traditions – A Historical Perspective

Hindu Musical Traditions – A Historical Perspective

TAT3102 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This Course is the second in the 2-Course Sequence in the Hindu Musical Traditions ... Read More
Hindu Musical Traditions -  A Cultural Immersion

Hindu Musical Traditions – A Cultural Immersion

TAT3101 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course is the first in a 2-Course sequence in the Hindu Musical Traditions – ... Read More
A student reading textbook outside the temple

How Hindu Dharma Transformed America

HAM2100 - (C.P.H.S – Core Course) This course explores the history and impact of Vedic Wisdom on America’s Spiritual Landscape ... Read More
Reconstructing Hindu History – The Commissions

Reconstructing Hindu History – The Commissions

HAM4201 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This course is the first of a two-quarter course sequence that examines the scientific ... Read More
Reconstructing Hindu History – The Omissions

Reconstructing Hindu History – The Omissions

HAM4202 - (C.P.H.S – Core Course) This course is the second of a two-quarter course sequence that examines the scientific evidence ... Read More
Hindu Contributions to the world in the realm of matter

Hindu Contributions to the world in the realm of matter

HSF1002 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course explores the contributions of the Hindus to the world in the realm of ... Read More
The Dharma Of Global Sustainability

The Dharma Of Global Sustainability

CPS2001 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course explores the impact of ancient Vedic Wisdom on the modern questions of ... Read More
Spiritualistic Hindu woman meditating using rosary or japa mala in the garden.

Bhagavad-Gita for Teens and Parents

HSF1300 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) “Bhagavad-Gita for Teens and Parents” course presents the principles of sound body, sound mind and ... Read More
Orientation to Hindu Studies

Orientation to Hindu Studies

HSF5000 - (C.P.H.S - REQUIRED Course) The word ‘Orientation’ in this course title carries two meanings. The first and obvious meaning ... Read More
Hindu Contributions to the World in the Realm of Mind – Towards Sciences and Arts

Hindu Contributions to the World in the Realm of Mind – Towards Sciences and Arts

HSF1203 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This course belongs to the set of the courses which explore the contributions of ... Read More
Lessons from Valmiki Ramayana For Teens & Parents

Lessons from Valmiki Ramayana For Teens & Parents

HSF 1006 - This course will help the participants get a well-versed understanding of the story, lessons, and teachings of ... Read More
Ayurveda – The Wisdom of Wellbeing

Ayurveda – The Wisdom of Wellbeing

TAT1101 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This foundational course is designed to make the timeless wisdom of Ayurveda accessible to ... Read More
The Yoga of Bhagavad Gita

The Yoga of Bhagavad Gita

YOG2001 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This Course takes the Students into a Journey of Exploration of Yoga as enunciated ... Read More
Advaita, Viśiśtādvaita and Dvaita – The three flavors of Vēdānta śāstra

Advaita, Viśiśtādvaita and Dvaita – The three flavors of Vēdānta śāstra

TAT4001 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) Hindu Thought provides for the simultaneous co-existence of varied perspectives on the nature of ... Read More
The Yoga of the Yoga Sutras

The Yoga of the Yoga Sutras

YOG2002 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This course takes the students into a journey of exploration of yoga as enunciated ... Read More
promise

Discover the contemporary Relevance of Hindu Dharma

HSF1007 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This course, targets an age group of 18-35 and will explore the question – ... Read More
Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner – DEHA

Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner – DEHA

HSF1004 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner – DEHA is the first part of a three-part sequence ... Read More
Lessons from Valmiki Ramayana

Lessons from Valmiki Ramayana

HSF 1005 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This course will help the participants get a well-versed understanding of the story, ... Read More
Hindu Temples and Traditions

Hindu Temples and Traditions

TAT 3104 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) Temples occupy an important place in the Hindu mind, both in India and ... Read More

As part of Hindu University of America’s commitment to ongoing community education, most courses available at the university including Graduate Division courses are open for registration from members of the community as continuing education students. Anyone including already employed professionals and prospective degree students may apply to any single course as a special student if they can demonstrate that they have the prerequisite preparation. They may discuss their preparedness to take any course with the course faculty or instructor.

  • The continuing education stream of courses is targeted towards people who wish to learn ongoingly, without pursuing a specific degree or certificate.
  • There are no prerequisites enforced, other than those required by the faculty, and anyone may register. We invite prospective students to try out a course or two and come back for more
  • Courses taken as part of community education can be bundled together to earn certificates at a later stage.
Sri Ramcharitmanas: Continuity in Change

Sri Ramcharitmanas: Continuity in Change

TAT1201 - This course explores the Ramcharitmanas, an epic poem composed in the sixteenth century in Ayodhya, North India, some
The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma  In the Light of Sri Aurobindo - Part 1

The Renaissance of Sanatana Dharma  In the Light of Sri Aurobindo – Part 1

HSF3101 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) More than any one single figure, Sri Aurobindo prophesied that the renaissance of Sanatana Dharma
Living our Svadharma in a contemporary world

Living our Svadharma in a contemporary world

HSF1101 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) A practical guide to - living our svadharma. Living in the contemporary world is
Holiday Season Gift Course

Holiday Season Gift Course

This Holiday Season, light a lamp of knowledge by gifting a HUA course(s) to your family and friends. Your Gift
Teaching Yoga for Children

Teaching Yoga for Children

YOG3004 - This course enables students to integrate yoga in their teaching career, for guiding children, and for developing spiritual
Lessons from Valmiki Ramayana

Lessons from Valmiki Ramayana

HSF 1005 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This course will help the participants get a well-versed understanding of the story,
Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner – DEHA

Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner – DEHA

HSF1004 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) Bhagavad-Gita for the Beginner – DEHA is the first part of a three-part sequence
promise

Discover the contemporary Relevance of Hindu Dharma

HSF1007 - (C.P.H.S - Elective Course) This course, targets an age group of 18-35 and will explore the question –
Race and Hindu Reform

Race and Hindu Reform

HAM6405 - This course is the second part of a two-part course sequence that begins with HAM6403-Race and Modern Hinduism.
Hinduism and Conflict Resolution

Hinduism and Conflict Resolution

CPS5502 - The course explores Hindu ideas and their relevance for conflict resolution. Click here to check if you are
Mahābhārata VI: Methods and Scholarship

Mahābhārata VI: Methods and Scholarship

TAT7206 - This course is the sixth of a 6-part Course Sequence that explores the great epic of India, The
Youth Yoga Teacher Training

Youth Yoga Teacher Training

YOG3005 - This course enables teen students to integrate yoga to manage their stress and to teach the community under
Teaching Yoga for Children

Teaching Yoga for Children

YOG3004 - This course enables students to integrate yoga in their teaching career, for guiding children, and for developing spiritual
The Bhagavadgītā and the West

The Bhagavadgītā and the West

HAM6404 - This course traces the history of the Western reception of the Bhagavadgītā, a central text of classical Hinduism.
Establishing the Importance of Hindu Studies in an Academic Setting

Introduction to the daśaśāntimantras

TAT1001 - This course provides an immersive introduction to the Mantra and Chanting traditions of Sanatana Dharma. It focuses on
Decolonizing the Hindu Condition

Decolonizing the Hindu Condition

PHS6302 - This course will analyze in detail the psychological and sociological consequences of the British colonial narratives on Hindus,
Race & Modern Hinduism

Race & Modern Hinduism

This course traces the construction of “race” in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe, beginning with the theological, political, and scientific source
Holistic Yoga - 2: Deepen Your Yoga Practice

Holistic Yoga – 2: Deepen Your Yoga Practice

YOG2000 - This course provides in-depth experience of holistic yoga, that integrates asana, pranayama, and meditation techniques for a sustained
Managing Diabetes through Holistic Yoga

Managing Diabetes through Holistic Yoga

This course provides online classroom training under the guidance of senior yoga therapists so that students can learn to practice
Reconstructing Hindu History – The Commissions

Reconstructing Hindu History – The Commissions

HAM4201 - (C.P.H.S - Core Course) This course is the first of a two-quarter course sequence that examines the scientific
Managing Back Pain through Holistic Yoga

Managing Back Pain through Holistic Yoga

YOG1006 - This course provides online classroom training under the guidance of senior yoga therapists so that students can learn
Hindu Musical Traditions -  A Cultural Immersion

Hindu Musical Traditions – A Cultural Immersion

TAT3101 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course is the first in a 2-Course sequence in the Hindu Musical Traditions –
Indian and Western Music Traditions – A Comparative Study

Indian and Western Music Traditions – A Comparative Study

TAT3103 - (C.P.H.S – Elective Course) This course is the first of a three-part course sequence in the Hindu Musical Traditions
Exploring Hinduism for Teens and Parents

Exploring Hinduism for Teens and Parents

HSF1001 - (C.P.H.S – Core Course) “Exploring Hinduism – The Overview”, is the first course in the series titled "Exploring Hinduism"
Antaranga Mandapam

Antaranga Mandapam

YOG3101 - How is this Coronavirus pandemic going to end? Will we return to our 'old selves' and our 'familiar
Holistic Yoga -Philosophy and Practice

Holistic Yoga -Philosophy and Practice

YOG1000 - This course provides an introduction to holistic yoga, that integrates yoga philosophy from classical scriptural texts and sustained
Indian woman holding Diwali oil lamp

Advaita Vedanta: A Method

HSF6004 - This course will explore and demonstrate the use of the methods (prakriyas) used in the Upanisads to unfold
Comparative Religion: Death and Meaning

Comparative Religion: Death and Meaning

HSF6003 - The central problem of human life is twofold: morality and mortality. Given the certainty of death, is there
History of Dharmaśāstras II

History of Dharmaśāstras II

HSF6006 - This is the second course in a two-part survey course that provides an overview of dharma literature from
History of Dharmaśāstras I

History of Dharmaśāstras I

HSF5006 - This two-part survey course provides an overview of dharma literature from ancient and medieval texts of the Hindu
Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo

Philosophy of Sri Aurobindo

An exploration of Sri Aurobindo’s philosophy and select writings with a focus on the intersection of spirituality and practicality towards
The Mahābhārata II: Dicing and Exile

The Mahābhārata II: Dicing and Exile

TAT7202 - This course is the second of a 6-part Course Sequence that explores the great epic of India, The
Human Rights: A Hindu Perspective

Human Rights: A Hindu Perspective

CPS6506 - To demonstrate how human rights concept and policy could be found in Hindu philosophy, and also how such
Akshardham

Discover Life by Exploring India

HSF5001 - A unique study abroad course that offers an authentic, transformative and enriching experience. This course is aimed at
Philosophy of Nonviolence

Philosophy of Nonviolence

An examination of the concept of nonviolence, its evolution and practice in various cultures and traditions.
Hunamities

The Humanities and the University – II

Inspired by neo-humanism, the research university was to facilitate self-cultivation, aesthetic appreciation (especially through knowledge of classical antiquity), and a
International Politics: A Hindu Perspective

International Politics: A Hindu Perspective

CPS6507 - To explore methods to bridge the chasm between the practice of international politics and universal moral principles.
Contesting Neo-Hinduism

Contesting Neo-Hinduism

PHS7302 - The current mainstream narrative in western academia is that there are two kinds of Hinduism: traditional and neo
Philosophy of Science and Hinduism

Philosophy of Science and Hinduism

PHS8302 - In the colonial and postcolonial contexts, there have been many attempts both by Indians and western people to
Philosophical Foundations of Orientalism

Philosophical Foundations of Orientalism

Orientalism employs a technique termed “deconstruction.” In order to effectively and critically examine a colonial and postcolonial discourse, it is
Orientalism and Hinduism

Orientalism and Hinduism

PHS7301 - In postcolonial scholarship, Edward Said’s work Orientalism can be considered a landmark text. This course helps students understand
Arthaśāstra

Arthaśāstra

CPS 5505 - To examine the core ideas such as state, war, and peace in the ancient text Arthashastra, a
Śhānti Parva

Śhānti Parva

CPS5504 - To elaborate ideas of good governance and duties of a ruler towards his subjects and Dharma as enshrined
Bhagavad gita

The Vision of the Bhagavad-Gītā

HSF5002 - Distilled from the Upaniṣad, the Śrīmad Bhagavad-Gītā is a fundamental text of Hindu Dharma which has given rise
Anticolonialism and Postcolonialism

Anticolonialism and Postcolonialism

PHS6301 - This course introduces the theories of various anticolonial and postcolonial writers in order to create a framework for
vedanta

The Foundation of Vedānta

HSF5004 - Vedānta also known as the Upaniṣad, found at the end of all four Vedas, reveal the goal and
vedas

An Overview of the Veda

HSF5003 - The Vedas are the oldest body of sacred knowledge known to man. A bird’s eye view of the
Vālmīki’s Rāmāyaṇa

Vālmīki’s Rāmāyaṇa

TAT7203 - Vālmīki’s Rāmāyaṇa is a classic story of human self-development focused on the relationship between the macrocosm (the kingdom)
The Mahābhārata I: From Beginning to End

The Mahābhārata I: From Beginning to End

TAT7201 - This course is the first of a 6-part Course Sequence that explores the great epic of India, The
Ādi Śaṅkara

Ādi Śaṅkara

TAT6202 - Ādi Śaṅkarācārya, the author of numerous commentaries and pedagogical tracts, is the seminal philosopher in Hinduism, especially its

Historical Methods and Sources

This course is intended to introduce students to the theory and practice of history. Students will read several different examples of historical writing. They will reflect on the reasons for writing and studying history, the importance of collective and individual memory, and the role of narrative in relation to identity. They will also examine the problems with historical memory, the dangers of historicism, and the transformation in the concept of history with the rise of “scientific” historiography. Students can expect to gain significant conceptual nuance about history, which they can then apply to their own research.

Areas of Study: History and Methods

Required/ Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee

 

How Hindu Dharma Transformed America

Course content:

In rigorously exploring the history and influence of Hindu Dharma, the course will be organized mainly around the key disseminators who forged a vital connection between the ancient rishis and the modern West. First among those Vedic transmitters were the swamis, gurus, and yogacharyas who brought their gifts to the West, from the earliest (Swami Vivekananda and Paramahansa Yogananda) to those who established a foothold in the 1960s and 70s (Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Srila Prabhupada, Swami Muktananda, and others) to those teaching today (Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Mata Amritanandamayi, Sadhguru, etc.) – as well as luminaries who strongly impacted America without ever coming here (Sri Aurobindo, Ramana Maharshi, and others). We’ll examine both the diversity and commonalities of teachings that penetrated America’s spiritual soil, and show how the core principles were skillfully adapted to the language, values, and communication methods of the new cultural context—and the tradeoffs that were made in the process. The obstacles the ambassadors from India had to overcome—racism, religious bigotry, colonial assumptions, finances, etc.—will be discussed as well. Also covered will be the prominent Westerners who imbibed Vedic wisdom through gurus and/or texts, integrated what they learned into their personal lives and their areas of expertise, and ultimately disseminated what they valued most to vast numbers of people. This second-hand transmission was sometimes explicit and properly attributed, and at other times altered so much (in style if not substance) that the original source was either vague or entirely obscured. In that context, we’ll examine the contribution of philosophers and public intellectuals (from Emerson to Aldous Huxley to contemporary scholars); psychologists (William James, Carl Jung, Abraham Maslow); scientists (Nikola Tesla, Erwin Schrodinger); and artists, including novelists (Herman Hesse, J.D. Salinger), poets (W.B. Yeats, Allen Ginsberg), filmmakers (George Lucas), and musicians (the Beatles especially).  The course will also describe how Hindu Dharma has influenced certain Christian and Jewish leaders, leading to significant shifts in religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices. The course will conclude with a look at the future in light of recent phenomena such as the medical embrace of hatha yoga and meditation and the assimilation of Hindu citizens of Indian descent since 1965.

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the profound impact of Hindu Dharma on American institutions, culture, and spirituality.
  2. Appreciate the remarkable achievements made by gurus, swamis, and yogacharyas in the face of challenges, obstacles, and resistance.
  3. Identify and evaluate the subtle (sometimes hidden) ways that Vedic principles changed American psychology, medicine, the arts, and religion.
  4. Distinguish between skillful adaptation and misappropriation in the Western embrace of Hindu Dharma.
  5. Discover the enormous breadth, variety, and depth of the Dharmic teachings that came to America.
  6. Learn about American history from different angles.
  7. Contemplate the future of Hinduism in America and how to safeguard the integrity of the ongoing adaptation to Western culture.

Class Structure

The class will meet once a week for up to 90 minutes. The teacher’s presentation, with the help of audio and video recordings, will last approximately 60 minutes. The remaining time will be devoted to questions and open discussion. There will be 10 such sessions followed by an additional session devoted to the presentation and discussion of student’s reflections regarding what they learned from the course and how they expect it will influence their lives.

Required/Elective: Elective

Area of Study: History & Methods

Prerequisites: None

Faculty/InstructorPhilip Goldberg

Start Date: October 12, 2021

End Date: December 21, 2021

Day: Every Tuesday

Time: 08:30 pm EST – 10:00 pm EST

Quarter Offered: Fall 2021

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Hindu Studies is normally a two-year full-time program of study which provides an in-depth understanding of Hindu principles, practices, traditions, values, diversity, history, philosophy, society, culture, and civilization. It prepares students for doctoral studies, or for vocations in teaching, education, chaplaincy and counseling, administration and leadership, non-profit management, priesthood, social work, fine arts, and the media. Students can access courses offered both by HUA as well as some select Affiliate Partner institutions.

  • Typically, 60 Quarter Credit hours, or 40 Semester Credit Hours are required to earn a Master’s Degree
  • To earn a Master’s Degree, students will have to take a set of 10 Program “Core Courses” which are required and an additional set of 10 Elective Courses.
  • Students are encouraged to specialize in an Area of Study by taking at least 6 courses from one area, to develop deep expertise.
  • Eligible students must have a Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent 4-years of post-secondary education
  • Students may opt to write a mini-thesis to earn 6 Quarter Course Credits as part of their course work
  • Special students with prior experience in religious, social work, or community service, may be eligible to participate in a “Thesis Only” Master’s Program.
  • This “thesis-Only” option will require the student to write a Thesis over 18 months (or longer) and establish that they have the equivalency of 54 Quarter Credit Hours (i.e. 9 Quarter credit hours per Quarter over 6 Quarters).
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Race & Modern Hinduism

Course content: Readings in race theory from early theoreticians of race; the development of the “two stocks” theory of humankind by Friedrich Schlegel; its development and application in the “biracial theory” of India by his brother A. W. Schlegel; the anchoring of the “biracial theory” in Indian history by Schlegel’s student Christian Lassen through his researches into the Mahābhārata; the expansion of this concept to explain all aspects of Indian culture, including its aesthetics, religion, philosophy, worldview, and its textual productions; the application of this principle to separate, date, and refashion Indian texts; the racism espoused by German Indologists; the rise of Aryan ideology and its interaction with German anti-Semitism; the impact of Indologists’ racist theories on Indian intellectuals in the twentieth century; the turn to physical, sociological, and mechanical explanations of Indian texts.

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Learn about the theological roots of the concept of race.
  2. Trace how the concept was scientized, reified, and universalized.
  3. How the concept has shaped modern humanities.

Class Structure

The class will meet for three hours each week. Students will be required to summarize and present one reading and to write a final paper on the author of their chosen reading.

Area of Study: History & Methods

Required / Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study / Concurrently enrolled or completed Orientation to Hindu Studies. 

Faculty / InstructorDr. Joydeep Bagchee

Day: Sunday

Start Date: 17 January 2021

End Date: 28 March 2021

Quarter Offered: Winter 2021

Race and Hindu Reform

Course Content:

Our aim is to trace the encounter between Hinduism and the Western historicist episteme, how Hindu thinkers responded to the incursion of this episteme, and how their responses shaped contemporary Hinduism. We shall particularly focus on the role of an English-speaking elite in this process, especially those active in the major reform movements, Brahmo Samaj and Arya Samaj. Throughout, we shall contrast traditional modes of self-relation, guided by ethical reflection and individual self-discipline (askesis), with modern views of Hinduism, including its cultural, nationalistic, and assimilated expressions. For critical perspectives, we shall look at the work of Weber, Arendt, Fanon, and others.

Course Objectives

In this course students will be able to:
1. Extend and apply their understanding of the concept of race.
2. Understand how colonization impacted Hindu society.
3. Reexamine the role of social reformers and modernizers in shaping modern India.

Class Structure

There will be a minimum of 3 contact hours with the faculty every week.

Areas of Study: History & Methods

Required/ Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Must have enrolled in Orientation to Hindu Studies or Completed Orientation to Hindu Studies

This course is the second part of a two-part course sequence that begins with HAM6403-Race and Modern Hinduism. However, with the faculty’s permission, students may take these courses in either sequence i.e. begin with Race and Hindu Reform and then take Race and Modern Hinduism.

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee  

Day: Sunday

Start Date:-18th July 2021

End Date:- 26th September 2021

Time:- 10:00 am EST 01:00 pm EST

Quarter: Summer 2021

Reconstructing Hindu History – The Commissions

Course Content:

Hindu History as it is reconstructed in school and college textbooks, suffers from both commissions and omissions. It presents the Hindu civilization as the illegitimate offspring of an “Aryan race” that came into India from somewhere outside, as it inter-mixed with the “native Dravidian” or Aboriginal population of India. This illegitimacy of the Hindu is a foundational presumption of most western scholarship on Hinduism. Hindus note with dismay the severe distortions, errors, misrepresentations, commissions, and omissions in the reconstructed History, which are nevertheless presented as uncontestable historical truth, certified by the western expert. More often than not, a Hindu cannot recognize their own civilization in the contemporary presentation of Hindu History. Before we embark on a positive reconstruction of Hindu history, it is necessary to confront the challenges posed by the already existing western reconstructions.

This 1-credit course will (a) expose the student to the problems and issues in the five major frameworks used by outsiders to reconstruct present-day narratives, (b) build the foundations used to challenge the existing narratives, and (c)  present an evidence-based alternative narrative for the deep history of Hindus. The course will be multi-disciplinary, and touch upon linguistics, astronomy, genetics, archeology, climate-records, and other related areas.

This course is for the person who wants a rational, logical understanding of ancient Hindu history, and wants to understand the evidence from multi-disciplinary fields. The pre-requisite for the course is a basic degree, in order to allow students to follow a college-level discourse. The background required to understand the various subject areas will be covered in the course itself.

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course the student will be able to:

  1. Explore the problems in the frameworks used for the contentious narratives of Hindu history.
  2. Discover how linguistics, genetics, astronomy, climate-studies, geology, and other areas can be used to evaluate narratives on Hindu history.
  3. Evaluate the evidence from these fields that have a bearing on the narratives.
  4. Acquire critical evaluation skills to analyze alternative narratives.

The Instructor will provide a strong understanding of the evidence from these areas, and how that contributes to a strong, bold, inspiring, factual new narrative on the Hindu civilization.

Course Outline:

The course outline is as follows, where each topic is expected to run for 75 minutes. Each class will have about 50 minutes of instruction, followed by about 25 minutes of interaction, Q&A. The first 10 topics will be handled in the 1st term, where a strong foundation will be laid for the antiquity of Hindus. The remaining topics will be handled in the second term, where we will address the knowledge systems of the Hindus.

Class Structure:
The class is structured into supplement classroom instruction with discussions and self-study each week. While the content being discussed in each class will be concluded within 50 minutes, the discussion time will be free format and can continue for an additional 25 minutes maximum.  Quizzes will evaluate students’ understanding of the material.  Students will either write a final paper on a topic of their choice from within the course syllabus or take a final exam at the end of each term.

Faculty: Dr. Raj Vedam

Required/Elective: Elective

Program of Study: Community Education Program (CEP), Certificate Program in Hindu Studies (CPHS)

Area of Study: History & Methods

Prerequisites: None.

Start Date: January 16, 2022

End Date: March 20, 2022

Day: Sunday

Time: 07:00 pm EST – 08:30 pm EST

Quarter Offered: Winter 2022

Reconstructing Hindu History – The Omissions

Course Content:

Hindu History as it is reconstructed in school and college textbooks suffers from both commissions and omissions. The course will examine the glaring omissions i.e. the knowledge-systems of the ancient Indians, and their impact on the world in various periods of time and make a strong case for an ancient Hindu civilization that was knowledge-based. It will explore the ancient knowledge systems of the Hindus in such diverse fields as (a) Philosophy; (b) Medicine; (c) Math; (d) Astronomy; (e) Music; (f) Technology; (g) Arts; (h) Sciences; (i) Textiles; (j) Metallurgy; (k) Architecture and many others. It will also explore available evidence for the outflow of knowledge from India to the world, from ancient through current times.

Hindus note with dismay the significant omissions in their western-reconstructed History, which is nevertheless presented as uncontestable historical truth, certified by the western expert. More often than not, a Hindu cannot recognize their own civilization in the contemporary presentation of Hindu History. This 1-credit course will (a) expose the student to original sources and efforts to reconstruct a more authentic narrative about Hindu History; (b) build the foundations used to challenge the existing narratives, and (c)  present an evidence-based alternative narrative for the deep history of Hindus. The course will be multi-disciplinary and draw from various original sources and curated content from published research papers in various disciplines, as well as classic textbooks by various authors. Course handouts will include key papers and class notes.

This course is for the person who wants a rational, logical understanding of ancient Hindu history, and wants to understand the evidence from multi-disciplinary fields. The background required to understand the various subject areas will be covered in the course itself.

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course the student will be able to:

  1. Explore the approaches that can be used to construct an authentic historical narrative about the Hindus
  2. Discover and investigate both original sources as well as contemporary research into these sources, for building alternative narratives on Hindu history.
  3. Evaluate the evidence from these fields that have a bearing on these historical narratives.
  4. Acquire critical evaluation skills to analyze alternative narratives.
  5. Transform their knowledge and understanding of Hindu history and culture.

The Instructor will provide a strong understanding of the evidence from these areas, and how that contributes to a strong, bold, inspiring, factual new narrative on the Hindu civilization.

Course Outline:

The course outline is as follows, where each topic is expected to run for 75 minutes. Each class will have about 50 minutes of instruction, followed by about 25 minutes of interaction, Q&A. The first 10 topics will be handled in the 1st term, where a strong foundation will be laid for the antiquity of Hindus. The remaining topics will be handled in the second term, where we will address the knowledge systems of the Hindus.

Class Structure:
The class is structured into supplement classroom instruction with discussions and self-study each week. While the content being discussed in each class will be concluded within 50 minutes, the discussion time will be free format and can continue for an additional 25 minutes maximum.  Quizzes will evaluate students understanding of the material.  Students will either write a final paper on a topic of their choice from within the course syllabus or take a final exam at the end of each term.

Faculty: Dr. Raj Vedam

Required / Elective: Core

Prerequisites: Admission to Program of Study

Area of Study: History & Methods

Program of Study:  Certificate Program in Hindu Studies (CPHS)

Start Date: July 17, 2022

End Date: September 25, 2022

Day: Every Sunday

Time: 07:00 pm EST – 08:30 pm EST

Quarter Offered: Summer 2022

Textual Criticism

Students will gain a grounded knowledge of textual criticism. They will learn basic concepts and terms used in textual criticism, along with the skills to read and use a critical edition. They will also learn how to edit texts themselves. The course will prepare students to critically analyze current editions, including editions or textual reconstructions applying the “text-historical method.”

Areas of Study: History and Methods

Required/ Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee

 

The Bhagavadgītā and the West

Course Content

Under “Reception” we shall study the arrival of the Bhagavadgītā in the West and the concerns that dominated its early reception. Here, we shall see how the Bhagavadgītā (and the Mahābhārata more generally) served as a foil for German nationalism and for Protestant Christian anxieties. Under “Reconstruction” we shall study how, in response to these anxieties, scholars manufactured a putative history of the text, reflecting their notions of the corruption of the original revelation, the subordination of the people by the church, and the usurpation of authority from the kings by the priesthood. Under “Research,” we shall then trace how these ideas about an original text, the so-called Ur-Gītā, and its subsequent interpolation percolated to contemporary Indian writers, using Meghnad Desai as an example. Finally, we shall also read excerpts from six authors (Brockington, Davis, Doniger, Rambachan, and Malinar) to understand the central issues alive in Gītā scholarship today (Brahmanism, nationalism, violence, caste, and racism). Optional assignments include looking at Christian apologists’ view of the Bhagavadgītā.

Course Learning Objectives

By the end of the course, students will:

  1. Acquire a comprehensive overview of the Western reception of the Bhagavadgītā.
  2. Understand the various concerns that drove this reception, including the many pseudo-problems (e.g., the “original” Gītā and the so-called problem of the unity of the Gītā) that they engendered.
  3. Develop a thorough knowledge of the Bhagavadgītā as an object of research, as well as of the latest scholarship on the Bhagavadgītā.
  4. Equip themselves with basic principles of textual criticism and the logic required for evaluating this scholarship.
  5. Explore ways of reading the Bhagavadgītā meaningfully as a coherent work of philosophy.

Class Structure

There will be a minimum of 3 contact hours with the faculty every week. The class is structured in a way that promotes discussion, dialogue, and debate based on the study of and reflection on study materials each week. The content discussed in each class and the discussions that follow will continue for about 180 minutes. The Faculty will distribute a detailed syllabus and give a bird’s eye view of the course at its very beginning.

Area of Study: History and Method

Program of Study: Community Education Program (CEP), Master of Arts in Hindu Studies (MA HS), Doctor of Philosophy in Hindu Studies (Ph.D. HS), Certificate Program in Hindu Studies (CPHS),

Required/Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study

Faculty/Instructor Dr. Joydeep Bagchee

Start Date: April 11, 2021

End Date: June 20th, 2021

Time: 10:00 am EST – 01:00 pm EST

Quarter Offered: Spring 2021

The Enlightenment

A key focus of this course is to examine the way the Enlightenment framed the relationship of religious authority to prejudice. Students will additionally learn how the Enlightenment set the terms of debate for issues that continue to affect the twenty-first century, including the conflict between tradition and modernity, science and faith, reason and revelation, the private and the public, and the religious and the secular spheres. They will learn to critically analyze these issues, provide historical context, and engage with contemporary political debates.

Areas of Study: History and Methods

Required/ Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee

 

The Humanities and the University – I

In this course, students will make the university itself—as a historical creation, a social body, and an institution—into an object of analysis. They will reflect on problems with the university, its relation to the wider public, and the dangers that concentration and specialization pose for learning. They will also gain critical insight into the university as an instrument of social segregation and control. Student projects can include: examining education access and outcomes for black vs. white students, graduate placement, and contemporary debates over affirmative action and discriminatory admission policies (e.g., at Harvard and other Ivy Leagues)

Area of Study: History and Methods

Required/ Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee

 

The Humanities and the University – II

In this course, students will make the university itself—as a historical creation, a social body, and an institution—into an object of analysis. They will reflect on problems with the university, its relation to the wider public, and the dangers that concentration and specialization pose for learning. They will also gain critical insight into the university as an instrument of social segregation and control. Student projects can include: examining education access and outcomes for black vs. white students, graduate placement, and contemporary debates over affirmative action and discriminatory admission policies (e.g., at Harvard and other Ivy Leagues).  

Area of Study: History and Methods

Required/Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission  into a Program of Study and completion of HAM 7401 – The Humanities and the University I

Instructor: Dr. Joydeep Bagchee