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Applied Vedic Science – Advanced (Āyurveda)

Course Content:

The wellbeing of the individual and society in the Vedic vision of the universe included both material and spiritual wellbeing. The Vedic vision did not exclude any group or peoples, unlike most ideologies which seek advantage for one group of people at the expense of others, but sought to provide such knowledge that could protect, enhance, empower and enrich life for all peoples who pursued these knowledge systems. The theory and practice of Āyurveda are one of the vital applied sciences derived from the Vedic vision. This course is the first of a two-part course series that provides the familiarity of the knowledge system of Āyurveda, by exploring its background and key contributors to the different schools of Āyurveda.

This course provides an in-depth appreciation of the science and practice of Āyurveda, through a study of one of the core texts pertaining to the portions suggesting regimen for individuals corresponding to the different seasons. This primary text in Sanskrit will be discussed, along with some of the major commentaries on the source text.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the sensibility in the system of Āyurveda that customizes its prescriptions based on factors that impact the health and wellbeing of people.
  2. Assimilate the role and relevance of Āyurveda as a manual of holistic wellbeing.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Elective

Prerequisites:

1) The medium of Instruction is Sanskrit

2)Only currently enrolled Sanskrit master’s certificate students can register for these courses. (MIT-SVS)

3) Admission into Master Program in Sanskrit through MIT-SVS

4) Completed previous MA Sanskrit Course

5) Completion of the Applied Vedic Science – Basic (Ayurveda)

Quarter Offered:  Winter Quarter

Applied Vedic Science – Advanced (Jyotisha)

Course Content:

This course provides an introduction to basic mathematical operations, the Indian way, through the text named Līlāvatī.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the methodology and approach of theorizing and calculating in the Indic system of mathematics.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: 

1) The medium of Instruction is Sanskrit

2)Only currently enrolled Sanskrit master’s certificate students can register for these courses. (MIT-SVS)

3) Admission into Master Program in Sanskrit through MIT-SVS

4) Completed previous MA Sanskrit Course – Basic (Jyotisha)

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2023

Applied Vedic Science – Vedanta (Basic)

Course Content:

This course provides a survey of the basic philosophical tenets of the different schools of Vedānta and introduces their primary sources. This course also provides the opportunity to study comparatively the respective commentaries of a principal Upaniṣad to aid the student in understanding the philosophical standpoints of these different schools.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the role of Vedānta in governing the Indic way of life.
  2. Understand the convergences and divergences of views among the different schools of Vedānta.
  3. Observe the multiplicity of interpretations of Vedic literature and the rationale behind such interpretations forming the basis of tenets propounded by the different schools of Vedānta.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Prerequisites: 

1) The medium of Instruction is Sanskrit

2)Only currently enrolled Sanskrit master’s certificate students can register for these courses. (MIT-SVS)

3) Admission into Master Program in Sanskrit through MIT-SVS

4) Completed previous MA Sanskrit Course 

Faculty / Instructor: Dr. Mahabaleswara Bhat

Quarter Offered: Winter 2023

 

Applied Vedic Sciences Basic (Yoga)

Course Content:

The wellbeing of the individual and society in the Vedic vision of the universe included both material and spiritual wellbeing. The Vedic vision did not exclude any group or peoples, unlike most ideologies which seek advantage for one group of people at the expense of others, but sought to provide such knowledge that could protect, enhance, empower and enrich life for all peoples who pursued these knowledge systems. The theory and practice of Yoga are one of the vital applied sciences derived from the Vedic vision. This course is the first of a two-part course series that provides the familiarity of the knowledge system of Yoga, through its primary text in Sanskrit.

This course introduces the categories of Yoga with their respective definitions, based on the Yogasūtras of Patañjali along with its prominent commentaries.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Assimilate the role and relevance of the system of Yoga through a comprehensive understanding of the mental and cognitive categories in the Yoga system
  2. Comprehend the definitions of the categories according to the Yoga system with elucidations from various commentaries.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Elective

Prerequisites:  Completion of 12 Credit-Hours of Course work in the MA in Sanskrit / Masters’ Certificate in Sanskrit

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2023

Living our Svadharma in a contemporary world

Course content:

The resistance and misunderstanding of Dharma in contemporary society is a result of separation of ‘values’ and living which was due to the separation of the church and state. This historical perspective and connection of Dharma with religion will be explored. The course will include the Hindu worldview of Dharma drawing from selected sections of the Vedas, Upanishads, Itihaasa, Bhagavad Gita and Dharmashastra. Samanya Dharma (universal values common to all) and Vishesha Dharma (specific duties) in the light of the framework of pancha-mahayajna (five sacred duties) will be elaborated. Through the wisdom of the Bhagavad Gita, the framework of karma, karma yoga and svadharma as a worship to Bhagavan will be unfolded. The distinction between a Dharma centred life vis-à-vis a life centred on wealth and pleasure will be drawn out leading to clarity amongst the students regarding their core values and priorities and clarity for their
lives ahead. In the Hindu worldview, living the good life is a life of svadharma.

Course Learning Objectives:
In this course students will be able to:
a) Understand and apply the framework of Samanya Dharma and Vishesha Dharma to their own lives.
b) Reflect on contemporary issues (e.g. Family and Marriage, War and peace, Conservation and Climate change etc.) in the light of Dharma
c) Integrate the Hindu worldview of Dharma into their own lives and develop clarity about their svadharma
d) Embody Dharma based leadership for the change they wish to contribute to, in the world

Class Structure:
There will be a minimum of 1 contact hour with the faculty instructor every week. The classis structured in a way that promotes discussion and debate based on self-study and reflection each week. While the content being discussed in each class will be concluded within 60 minutes, the discussion time will be free format, and can continue for an additional 30 minutes maximum.
In alignment with the culture of the Hindu University of America, the interactive course is designed to be a samvaada (a meaningful dialogue) which results in jnana and yoga, a transformation paving the way for leading meaningful change in our communities. The significance of the course is on living an enriched life of svadharma in all aspects and hence emphasis will be given to assignments aiding reflection and practical application. During the course, students will be required to submit two short essays. These will be based
on students’ self-reflection on what they have learnt, assimilated and applied in their lives.

Required / Elective: Elective

Area of Study: Hindu Studies Foundation 

Prerequisites: Admission into program of study.

Faculty / Instructor: Swamini Brahmaprajnananda Saraswati

Start Date:  January 14, 2023

End Date:  March 25, 2023

Day: Every Saturday

Time: 09:00 pm EST – 10:30 pm EST

Quarter Offered: Winter 2023

 

Proficiency Phase in Spoken Samskritam – 2

Course Contents: 

  1. Lessons 6 to 15 of the sambhAShaNa-sopAnam book 
  2. Skit production given a real-life scenario 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Listening to advanced level Samskritam conversations 
  2. Pronouncing the words correctly 
  3. Comprehending the spoken words, without any help in English 
  4. Gaining an advanced level vocabulary, using case-endings, tenses, and suffixes
  5. Engaging in advanced level conversations 
  6. Producing a skit from scratch in a group environment 

Books: 

  1. sambhAShaNa-sopAnam – book from Samskrita BhArati 

Faculty: Sri Chandrashekhar Raghu , Smt. Parvathi Sriram

Required/Elective: Required

Prerequisites: Admission to Program of Study (MCSS), completion of SAN0003 or equivalent

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Program of Study: Micro-Certificate in Spoken Samskritam (MCSS)

Start Date:

End Date:

Day: Fridays

Time: 08:00 PM EST – 09:30 PM EST

Quarter Offered: Winter 2023

Sāhitya – IV

Course content:

In the Hindu literary tradition, literary compositions inculcate awareness and sensibility of Dharma in the minds of both the commoner and the connoisseur. As with all śāstras in the Indic knowledge traditions, kāvya and kāvya-śāstra, i.e. literary composition and the theory of composition have a well instituted and standardized methodology, structure and system. This is the fourth and final course in a sequence of four courses in Sāhitya – Classical Sanskrit literature. Excellence in prose composition is considered as the gold standard of literary creativity in the Sanskrit literary world. Prose compositions are far less common in comparison to poetry in Sanskrit literature. The mixed medium of campū also has a lesser presence but nevertheless has a distinct identity from the prose and poetry literature, from which it draws its structure, as well as from drama.

This course explores the features of prose and campū literature in Sanskrit and provides an illustration of each of the two types. The course also introduces the dialectics and critical analysis that the theorists of Sanskrit literature engaged in.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the critical inquiry involved in the construction of theories in the Hindu knowledge traditions.
  2. Observe how the standards of creative writing were evaluated differently in the case of prose and campū compositions.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Prerequisites:  Completion of Sāhitya – III

Faculty / Instructor:  Prof Madhusudan Penna

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2023

Term Project – Sanskrit Studies

Course Content:

This course seeks to provide the learner’s familiarity with research experience in a subject of their interest based on their study thus far. The course involves selection of a text or a portion of a text for independent study along with the allied texts and commentaries.  It requires the student to present their understanding and interpretation of the selected text portions through a seminar paper. It also involves creating a concept map of the various structures to which the text portion aligns.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Independently read, understand, interpret and present the knowledge assimilated from a selected text or portion of a text.
  2. Apply the methods of comprehension and interpretation of śāstric texts first-hand for deeper assimilation.
  3. Prepare a concept map of the selected text portion and identify the structures used in framing the text portion in relation to a systematic comprehension of the full text.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Prerequisites:  Completion of 36 Credit-Hours of Course work in the MA in Sanskrit / Masters’ Certificate in Sanskrit

Faculty / Instructor:  Guided independent work

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2023

The Vedas (Ṛgveda)

Course content:

Vedic texts constitute the foundation of the worldview and way of life that informs Hindu life and culture. The Ṛgveda is one of the oldest collections of hymns i.e. Mantras also called as rca-s in Vedic Sanskrit.   Like the other Vedas, Ṛgveda is also structured into sections called Saṁhitā (verses in praise of Vedic devatās or deities), Brāhmaṇa (ritual practice or liturgy), Āraṇyaka (the link between ritual and spiritual expositions) and Upaniṣad (spiritual and philosophical expositions or exegesis). While the Rgveda varies in content and purpose from the other Vedas, it contains the kernel of the Vedic worldview and its social and philosophical implications.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the arrangement of mantras in the Ṛgveda and an overview of their content
  2. Understand the Vedic worldview and its philosophy of life
  3. Recognize the variation and divergence of Vedic and classical Sanskrit language
  4. Distinguish the convergence and divergence in nature, features, form, content, structure, and utility of the four Vedas, with regards to Vedic practices.

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Pre-requisite:

1) The medium of Instruction is Sanskrit

2)Only currently enrolled Sanskrit master’s certificate students can register for these courses. (MIT-SVS)

3) Admission into Master Program in Sanskrit through MIT-SVS

4) Completed previous MA Sanskrit Course 

Faculty: Dr. Ramanujan

Quarter: Winter 2023

 

Vyākaraṇa – II

Course content:

Pāṇini’s Aṣṭādhyāyī is a monumental work in the sūtra format (short aphorisms) that establishes the grammar for classical Sanskrit as a language. At the same time, the text also presents a general model for language description, that goes beyond Sanskrit as a specific language instance. This is the second course in a sequence of four courses on Vyākaraṇa (grammar) based on Pāṇini’s Aṣṭādhyāyī. The Vyākaraṇa tradition provides interpretation and analysis of the sūtras and elucidates the process of generation of various language components through treatises like Siddhānta-kaumudī and Laghu-siddhānta-kaumudī (for beginners) in the lines of Pāṇini’s Aṣṭādhyāyī. Traditionally, the commencement of the study of Vyākaraṇa is done with these texts.

 

In this course the students will be able to:

  1. Understand the architecture of Aṣṭādhyāyī as a treatise of language structure
  2. Independently study Aṣṭādhyāyī with allied texts
  3. Comprehend the computational model of Sanskrit grammar as articulated by Aṣṭādhyāyī
  4. Apply the rules of interpretation of Aṣṭādhyāyī as proposed by Pāṇini
  5. Understand the phonetic transition that occurs in the conjunction of sounds
  6. Appreciate the robustness and holistic excellence of the treatise
  7. Understand the philosophy of language that provided the concept of apoddhāra based on which Pāṇini formulated his Aṣṭādhyāyī

Area of Study:- Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Prerequisites:

1) The medium of Instruction is Sanskrit

2)Only currently enrolled Sanskrit master’s certificate students can register for these courses. (MIT-SVS)

3) Admission into Master Program in Sanskrit through MIT-SVS

4) Completed previous MA Sanskrit Course

5) Completion of Vyākaraṇa – I

Faculty / Instructor:  Dr. Tilaka Rao

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2023