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CPSP Beginners-Course 3

Course Structure 

This course is structured in the form of one Quarter (10 weeks, 1.5 hours per week). Students will take an exam at the end of the course during the 11th week. Structured innovatively using the curriculum and textbooks designed by Samskrita Bharati USA (SBusa.org), the course will be based upon material contained in the SB – USA – published books,“SUSHAMAA” & “SUBHAASHAA” augmented with other appropriate course content.

This course is structured to allow a beginner level student to start listening, writing, and reading the DevanAgari Script through a streamlined set of exercises.

Note: If you are registering from outside the United States, you will receive scanned copies of the textbooks. Use below discount code at checkout for reduced textbook cost.

CPSP-TEXTBOOK-B10

Required / Elective: Required 

Program of Study: Beginner Level Certificate Program in Sanskrit Proficiency

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Prerequisites: None

Faculty / Instructor: Sri Chandrashekhar Raghu  / Sri Srinath Chakravarty

Quarter Offered: Winter 2021

Start Date: Tuesday, 5th, January 2021

End Date: Saturday, 20th, March 2021

Day: Every Tuesday

Time: 09:00 pm EST – 10:30 pm EST

CPSP Beginners-Course 4

Course Structure 

This course is structured in the form of one Quarter (10 weeks, 1.5 hours per week). Students will take an exam at the end of the course during the 11th week. Structured innovatively using the curriculum and textbooks designed by Samskrita Bharati USA (SBusa.org), the course will be based upon material contained in the SB – USA – published book, “SUVAANEE”, augmented with other appropriate course content.

This course is structured to allow a beginner level student to start listening, writing, and reading the DevanAgari Script through a streamlined set of exercises.

Note: If you are registering from outside the United States, you will receive scanned copies of the textbooks. Use below discount code at checkout for reduced textbook cost.

CPSP-TEXTBOOK-B5

Required / Elective: Required 

Program of Study: Beginner Level Certificate Program in Sanskrit Proficiency

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Prerequisites: None

Faculty / Instructor: Sri Chandrashekhar Raghu / Sri Srinath Chakravarty

Quarter Offered: Spring 2021

Start Date: Tuesday, 6th, April 2021

End Date: Saturday, 19th, June 2021

Day: Every Tuesday

Time: 09:00 pm EST – 10:30 pm EST

Hindu Musical Traditions – A Historical Perspective

Course Content:

While Indian music traditions are diverse, the core of the various traditions stand out as unique with their emphasis on ‘the raga’ and ‘the tala’ and a core of commonality that is rooted in spirituality with a history of over two millennia.  Our goals are:

  1. To provide a guided overview of the history and evolution of Indian music
  2. To provide an overview of the history of composers, sages, saints, emperors and luminaries who have contributed to the evolution of music.

Course Learning Objectives:

After completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss names and works of musicologists and musical luminaries
  2. Comprehend the contribution of ancient treatises (in Sanskrit and Tamil) such as the Natya Sastra of Bharata, the Silappathikaram of Illango Adigal and the Sangita Ratnakara of Sarangdev, the Chaturdandi Prakasika of Venkatamakhi and modern works such as the Sangita Sampradaya Pradarsini of Subbarama Dikshitar and the work of Pandit Bhatkhande.
  3. Obtain a brief understanding of the Western world’s study and outlook on Indian music.
  4. Discuss the contribution of the Bhakti movement and the Hindu Saints of Tamilnadu, Karnataka and Maharashtra and Bengal  to Indian Art Music.
  5. Discuss the contribution of Vaggeyakaras and the sacred geography of India to Art music.
  6. Discucss the impact of Islamic and Persian traditions on Indian music
  7. Discuss the contribution of the Devadasi tradition to Indian Art
  8. Discuss issues facing contemporary Indian music

Class Structure

There will be a minimum of 1 contact hour every week. The class is structured in a way that promotes discussion and debate based on listening experiences and reading material. While the content being discussed in each class will be concluded within 60 minutes, the discussion time will be free format, and can continue for an additional 30 minutes maximum. During the course, students will be required to submit two short essays. They need not be academic quality papers – but should be based on students’ self-reflection on what they have learned and assimilated so far.

Prerequisites: Enrollment into a Program of study and must have completed TAT 3101 – Indian and Western Music Traditions – A Comparative Study

Faculty / Instructor: Dr. Kanniks Kannikeswaran

Required / Elective: Elective

Start Date: TBD

End Date: TBD

Time: TBD

Day:  TBD

Quarter Offered: Winter 2020

Holistic Yoga 1 – Concepts and Techniques

Course Description:

Developed by the ancient Hindu sages in the Indian subcontinent, yoga is a psycho-somatic discipline with its roots going back over 5,000 years. The word “yoga” means “union” and hints at the final goal of yoga practice–to be in union with one’s true nature. This goal, which leads one on the path of optimal health and human wellness, can be achieved by following the practices developed as a part of an integrated and holistic system of yoga.

In this course, we will explore the concept of Pancha Kosha, the five sheaths of human personality as defined in yogic texts: Annamaya Kosha — the physical layer; Pranamaya Kosha — the vital layer; Manomaya Kosha — the emotional layer; Vijnanamaya Kosha — the intellectual layer; and finally the Anandamaya Kosha — the pure-consciousness layer of our existence.

Furthermore, we will study Sage Patanjali’s eight limbs of yoga, popularly known as Ashtanga Yoga. These eight steps give a comprehensive and systematic approach to developing one’s mind. Ashtanga Yoga includes Yama (guidelines for ethical relationships), Niyama (guidelines for ethical personal living), Asana (postures for physical practice), Pranayama (controlled and deliberate breathing patterns), Pratyahara (withdrawal of the mind from distractions), Dharana (focus of the mind upon a goal), Dhyana (the expansion of the focused mind into everyday life), and Samadhi (Complete Absorption in Oneself).

Yoga is not just a practice of asana and meditation on the mat. While such a practice constitutes the practice of Raja Yoga, the other three disciplines that we include are: Karma Yoga — the yoga of detached action; Bhakti Yoga — the yoga of love, acceptance, and devotion; and Jnana Yoga — the yoga of contemplation and reflection, completing the holistic practice of yoga. By combining all four streams of yoga — Raja yoga, Karma yoga, Bhakti yoga, and Jnana yoga — one is able to achieve a state of peace, creativity, and fulfilment in life.

We will learn about each stream of yoga and delve deeply into Raja yoga, which focuses on disciplining the mind and body using yoga practices. This holistic yoga course contains guided physical yoga practices, lectures, discussions, and offline assignments.

Learning Outcome:

In this course students will be able to:

  • Learn basic yoga practices of breath-synchronized movements, asana, pranayama, and meditation.
  • Understand the scope and relevance of yoga philosophy and how to apply it to one’s daily life.
  • Apply yoga practices and concepts to manage their physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health.
  • Gain clarity on the teachings of the Bhagavad Gita in relation to practicing yoga.
  • Explore the eight limbs of Patanjali’s Ashtanga Yoga — yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, pratyahara, dharana, dhyana, and Samadhi.

Required/Elective: Required

Prerequisites: Admission to the program of study.

Faculty/Instructor: Anil Surpur Yogashree N.V. Raghuram, Ashwini Surpur, Vinutha Kornaya

Quarter Offered: Winter 2021

Area of Study:- Yoga Studies

Day:- Every Sunday

Start Date:- 10th January 2020

End Date:- 14th March 2020

Time:- 07:00 pm EST – 09:00 pm EST

Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika Basic

Course Content:

This course examines the evolutionary stages of the Nyāya system of thought from its ancient (prācīna) origins to its recent (navya) form, in the process incorporating the Vaiśeṣika ontology into its system.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the evolving nature of the use of logic and reason within various technical Indic knowledge systems
  2. Appreciate the elaborate cognition-centric approach in Indic knowledge systems which emphasized logical reasoning and validation and mechanisms of expression
  3. Distinguish and apply the classification schema at the heart of the Nyāya system on other Vedic and Indic knowledge systems

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Masters Certificate or MA in Sanskrit Program

Faculty / Instructor:  Prof M. A. Alwar

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2021

Reconstructing Hindu History – The Omissions

Course Content:

Hindu History as it is reconstructed in school and college textbooks suffers from both commissions and omissions. The course will examine the glaring omissions i.e. the knowledge-systems of the ancient Indians, and their impact on the world in various periods of time and make a strong case for an ancient Hindu civilization that was knowledge-based. It will explore the ancient knowledge systems of the Hindus in such diverse fields as (a) Philosophy; (b) Medicine; (c) Math; (d) Astronomy; (e) Music; (f) Technology; (g) Arts; (h) Sciences; (i) Textiles; (j) Metallurgy; (k) Architecture and many others. It will also explore available evidence for the outflow of knowledge from India to the world, from ancient through current times.

Hindus note with dismay the significant omissions in their western-reconstructed History, which is nevertheless presented as uncontestable historical truth, certified by the western expert. More often than not, a Hindu cannot recognize their own civilization in the contemporary presentation of Hindu History. This 1-credit course will (a) expose the student to original sources and efforts to reconstruct a more authentic narrative about Hindu History; (b) build the foundations used to challenge the existing narratives, and (c)  present an evidence-based alternative narrative for the deep history of Hindus. The course will be multi-disciplinary and draw from various original sources and curated content from published research papers in various disciplines, as well as classic textbooks by various authors. Course handouts will include key papers and class notes.

This course is for the person who wants a rational, logical understanding of ancient Hindu history, and wants to understand the evidence from multi-disciplinary fields. The background required to understand the various subject areas will be covered in the course itself.

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course the student will be able to:

  1. Explore the approaches that can be used to construct an authentic historical narrative about the Hindus
  2. Discover and investigate both original sources as well as contemporary research into these sources, for building alternative narratives on Hindu history.
  3. Evaluate the evidence from these fields that have a bearing on these historical narratives.
  4. Acquire critical evaluation skills to analyze alternative narratives.
  5. Transform their knowledge and understanding of Hindu history and culture.

The Instructor will provide a strong understanding of the evidence from these areas, and how that contributes to a strong, bold, inspiring, factual new narrative on the Hindu civilization.

Course Outline:

The course outline is as follows, where each topic is expected to run for 75 minutes. Each class will have about 50 minutes of instruction, followed by about 25 minutes of interaction, Q&A. The first 10 topics will be handled in the 1st term, where a strong foundation will be laid for the antiquity of Hindus. The remaining topics will be handled in the second term, where we will address the knowledge systems of the Hindus.

Class Structure:
The class is structured into supplement classroom instruction with discussions and self-study each week. While the content being discussed in each class will be concluded within 50 minutes, the discussion time will be free format and can continue for an additional 25 minutes maximum.  Quizzes will evaluate students understanding of the material.  Students will either write a final paper on a topic of their choice from within the course syllabus or take a final exam at the end of each term.

Faculty: Dr. Raj Vedam

Required / Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission to Program of Study

Area of Study: History & Methods

Program of Study: Community Education Program (CEP), Certificate Program in Hindu Studies (CPHS)

Start Date: TBD

End Date: TBD

Day: TBD

Time: TBD

Quarter Offered: Winter 2021

Sāhitya – Padya

Course content:

This course elucidates the basics of Sanskrit poetics, focusing on the purposes of literary composition, standards and the nature of the verbal and semantic elements that constitute literary compositions.

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Review a literary work based on the knowledge of theories of poetics and its technicalities to evaluate and better appreciate it
  2. Understand the various potencies of words and how their significance and meaning is the kavi’s masterstroke in literary works
  3. Enjoy reading context-based and non-context-based literature

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies

Required / Elective: Required

Prerequisites: Completion of Sāhitya Landscape

Faculty / Instructor:  Prof Madhusudan Penna

Quarter Offered:  Winter 2021

Sanskrit Grammatical Structures and Verses

Course Content

  1. The fifth declension / Ablative case for pronouns
  2. Introduction to Ayurveda
  3. The sixth declension / Genitive case, the ktavatu usage, gerunds
  4. Introduction to BhAgavatam
  5. Wise sayings and their meanings in Sanskrit
  6. The seventh declension / Locative case

Learning Objectives: In this course, students will be able to: 

  • Analyze noun and verb structures of verses and proverbs;
  • Recognize passages from popular Sanskrit texts; and
  • Paraphrase using grammatically correct Sanskrit.

Required / Elective: Required 

Area of Study: Sanskrit Studies 

Program of Study:  Certificate Program in Sanskrit Proficiency (CP SP)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of SAN-1003 

Faculty / Instructor: Sri Chandrashekhar Raghu / Sri Srinath Chakravarthy 

Quarter Offered: Winter 2021

Start Date: January 6th, 2021

End Date: March 19th, 2021

Day: Every Wednesday & Friday

Time: 9:00-10:30pm EST

The Dharma Of Global Sustainability

Course Content:

The course is intended for the youth of this world who are facing some of the gravest environmental challenges ever faced by any generation of human beings. It is also intended for all those who love the youth of this world, for the youth cannot solve these challenges on their own while their parents, grandparents, uncles, and aunts continue to pile on more grave challenges for them to solve.

The course will rely heavily upon an updated version of the 2011 book, “Carbon Dharma: The Occupation of Butterflies”.  The nine chapters of the book will be the basis for the course material for Sessions 2-10 of the course, while the introductory session will provide an overview of what the course will cover. The topics that will be covered are as follows:

Session 1: Overview of the course
Session 2: Focusing on transformation through the metaphor of metamorphosis
Session 3: The law of Karma and why actions and inaction matter
Session 4: An exploration of Hindu Dharma and how it informs our actions today
Session 5: Applying Dharmic concepts to our sustainability challenges
Session 6: Framing the Kurukshetra of our times and how the Bhagavad Gita informs our right action
Session 7: The Caterpillar culture – an examination of the “Kaurava” side that we must shed
Session 8: The Butterfly culture – an examination of the “Pandava” side that we must nurture
Session 9: How do we all become Climate Healers – the many stepped journeys towards global sustainability
Session 10: Awakening through awareness into the realm of global sustainability

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course students will be able to:

  1. Understand the profound impact of Hindu Dharma on any plausible solutions to our environmental challenges
  2. Appreciate the impact that our daily actions have on our environmental and social predicaments.
  3. Identify the power that we have to transform our world.
  4. Understand that we have all the tools and technologies we need to transform our world.
  5. Discover the enormous breadth, variety, and depth of our Dharmic teachings.

Class Structure:

The class will meet once a week for up to 90 minutes. The teacher’s presentation, with the help of audio and video recordings, will last approximately 45 minutes. The remaining time will be devoted to questions and open discussion. There will be 10 such sessions followed by an additional session devoted to the presentation and discussion of student and teacher reflections regarding what they learned from the course and how they expect it will influence their lives

Prerequisites: None

Area of Study: Conflict and Peace Studies

Faculty / Instructor:  Dr. Sailesh Rao

Required / Elective: Elective

Start Date: Wednesday, January 13th, 2021

End Date: Wednesday, March 24th, 2021

Time: 9.00 pm – EST – 10.30 pm – EST

Day: Wednesday

Quarter Offered: Winter 2021

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