fbpx

Decolonizing the Hindu Condition

This course will analyze in detail the psychological and sociological consequences of the British colonial narratives on Hindus, and how the narratives now are being perpetuated by the Hindus themselves. Just as correct diagnosis of any condition is a prerequisite for its cure, for decolonizing the Hindu condition, it is important to first understand the characteristics and consequences of colonization. Then, as a natural corollary, the process of decolonization can begin. Without a thorough understanding of what colonization has wrought upon the Hindu condition, decolonization will remain a mere buzz word or a vacuous term devoid of meaning.

$900.00

Clear

Course Code: PHS 6302

Credit Hours: 3

Course Level: 600

$900.00

This course will analyze in detail the psychological and sociological consequences of the British colonial narratives on Hindus, and how the narratives now are being perpetuated by the Hindus themselves. Just as correct diagnosis of any condition is a prerequisite for its cure, for decolonizing the Hindu condition, it is important to first understand the characteristics and consequences of colonization. Then, as a natural corollary, the process of decolonization can begin. Without a thorough understanding of what colonization has wrought upon the Hindu condition, decolonization will remain a mere buzz word or a vacuous term devoid of meaning.

Clear
SKU: N/A Categories: ,

Description

Course Content:

Narratives influence the perception of reality and truth. A distorted narrative or a false narrative produces a distorted perception of reality or truth or “false consciousness.” One of the chief aims of the Postcolonial Hindu Studies concentration is to explore thoroughly how the British studies on India during the colonial era generated a false narrative which distorts the manner in which the Hindu reality is described in the texts of the Hindus. This false narrative, however, has had and continues to have cultural, social, and psychological consequences. Whereas the course Anticolonialism and Postcolonialism gives a theoretical framework to understand the psychological and sociological consequences of colonization and examines these issues from a universal perspective, this course gets into specifics regarding Hinduism and India. This course has a reciprocal relationship with the course Anticolonialism and Postcolonialism and each course dialectically enhances the understanding of the other. It is not necessary to take one before the other, and both may be taken in either sequence.

Course Learning Objectives:

In this course students will be able to

  1. learn about the consequences of colonization on Hindu psyche and being
  2. explore how language, self-image, culture, and politics of the Hindus have been impacted by colonization
  3. examine the myths and generalizations about the Hindus crafted and perpetuated during the colonial rule that continue to persist in the current day mainstream discourse
  4. investigate how Hindus themselves perpetuate colonial myths today, without critically examining them or investigating their veracity.

Class Structure

There will be a minimum of 3 contact hours with the faculty every week. The class is structured in a way that promotes discussion, dialogue, and debate based on the study of and reflection on study materials each week. The content discussed in each class and the discussions that follow will continue for about 180 minutes. The Faculty will distribute a detailed syllabus and give a bird’s eye view of the course at its very beginning.

Required / Elective: Elective

Prerequisites: Admission into a Program of Study

Faculty / Instructor:  Dr. Kundan Singh

Quarter Offered: Spring 2021

Day: Saturday

Time: 02:00 pm EST – 05:00 pm EST

Start Date: April 10th, 2021

End Date: June 19th, 2021

Additional information

Quarter Offered

Share

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Your Cart